in

Fortnite team moves into the new NRG house

In theory, solo Fortnite competitions are the only way to determine the best players in the world. In practice, however, it doesn’t tend to play out that way. There are too many elements that are out of a player’s control. Sometimes, one lucky shot can end a player’s game and their chance at a high placement.

On top of the RNG, we have teaming, stream sniping, and other forms of skirting the rules. This always happens in high-priced solo competitions, and was on full display during the FNCS Grand Finals, yesterday.

We’ll start with this clip from Adonis. He had a coach in his call – as many players do – but this coach seemed to know a lot about the player Adonis was facing. Watch as Tfue marvels at how much information Adonis’ coach has – down to how many materials and shields his opponent is carrying.

The information didn’t do Adonis much good, as he died in this engagement and ended up finishing in 98th place – seven places behind Stretch, who didn’t even play the final round.

This is undoubtedly not the only instance of stream sniping that we saw during the FNCS – just the only one that we’ve seen caught on camera. Teaming was another common issue, however.

Wolfiez, a popular EU pro, tweeted a clip of his game crashing during one of his matches. This was very unfortunate for him, but he later deleted the tweet because of what was visible in the background: a conversation and call with fellow pro, LeTsHe, that occurred after both players ended their streams (while they were still competing).

In the screenshot, Wolfiez also had a stream up in the background. This isn’t proof of anything nefarious, however, as pros routinely watch other streams once they are eliminated. The call and conversation isn’t proof of anything either, but it shows the fine line between sharing information and outright teaming.

We even saw this brought up when it comes to fighting…